What does a Minor Service include?

  • Replace oil and filter
  • Replace spark plugs
  • Inspect and set ignition timing (if applicable)
  • Inspect air filter, replace if necessary
  • Inspect signals, lights, and horn
  • Inspect, adjust, and lube cables
  • Inspect brakes and check fluid level
  • Inspect tires and adjust air pressure
  • Inspect chain and sprockets
  • Adjust and lube chain
  • Check final drive fluid level (if applicable)
  • Check coolant (if applicable)
  • Inspect steering and suspension
  • Test battery and charging system
  • Check clutch and shifting action
  • Test ride motorcycle

 

What does a Major Service include?

  • Charge battery
  • Replace oil and filter
  • Replace spark plugs
  • Check and adjust valve clearances
  • Replace valve cover gasket and bolt seals
  • Inspect air filter, replace if necessary
  • Inspect and set ignition timing (if applicable)
  • Inspect signals, lights, and horn
  • Inspect, adjust, and lube cables
  • Inspect brakes and check fluid level
  • Inspect tires and adjust air pressure
  • Inspect chain and sprockets
  • Adjust and lube chain
  • Replace final drive fluid (if applicable)
  • Replace coolant (if applicable)
  • Sync carbs/throttle bodies
  • Inspect steering and suspension
  • Test battery and charging system
  • Check clutch and shifting action
  • Test ride motorcycle

 

How often should I service my bike?

We recommend you follow the manufacturer's suggested maintenance schedule. Refer to your owner's manual.


How often should I change my tires?

Change your tires when the wear indicators, which are located in the grooves between the raised tread, become even with the tread, or if they are more than five years old.


How do I break in new tires?

New tires can be slippery. For the first 100 city miles (50 freeway/highway) be aware of, and avoid, anything on the road that is metal, painted or applied. These surfaces cause diminished traction.

Metal surfaces include grates, manhole covers, Muni/rail tracks, and seams on bridges. Painted and applied surfaces include crosswalks, speed limits, rail road crossings and Botts' dots.

If you cannot avoid these surfaces, do not brake on them, and do not cross them at an extreme lean angle. Try to maintain your speed while crossing them in a perpendicular manner.

Lower your speed and do not carry passengers for the first 100 miles. Manufacturers recommend that you not exceed 65 MPH. Also, allow yourself extra distance for braking. Do not tailgate.

In about a week, check the air pressure. After the tire is mounted to the rim, there is an initial "stretching" period. This period allows the tire to hold a greater volume of air, making the initial inflation pressure inadequate. You can usually find your recommended tire pressure printed on a label on your bike. Depending on the bike, the label can be found on your chain guard or rear swing arm, or on the vehicle identification label on the steering down tube. You can also refer to your owner's manual.

Do not inflate tires to the pressure shown on the sidewalls. That pressure is the maximum inflation deemed safe by the manufacturer. It is not the ideal pressure for your bike.


How do I break in new brakes?

For the first 100 city miles, don't change the way you brake, but give yourself extra braking distance. New brake pads need time to bed into the rotor(s). This is because there are usually high and low points on the surface of a brake rotor (unless the rotor is brand new). The high points of the rotor make first contact with the pad surface, and  until they have bedded into the pad, there will not be 100% contact between the surfaces of the brake pads and rotor. 

For drum brakes, the 100 city mile break-in period also applies.


How do I break in a new chain?

Some chains will stretch during the first 250 miles. During this time, ride normally. Then, check the chain slack and adjust to its proper specification if needed. If you are uncomfortable doing this yourself, we are happy to do it for you.


How often should I lube my chain?

Proper chain maintenance is directly related to the life of your chain and sprockets. Inspect and lubricate your chain after every 250 miles (roughly two tanks of gas), and after any time the chain gets wet. The best time to lube your chain is after a ride, when the chain is still warm. The warmth allows the lube to better penetrate the links and rollers. Use only motorcycle specific lube, grease, or wax. Other lubricants, such as WD40 or Tri-Flow, don't adhere properly and can cause premature chain and sprocket wear.


How often should I change my oil?

We suggest you change your oil every 2,500 miles, or every six months. Manufacturer's service manuals may indicate differently--some advise a change every 8,000 miles--but, don't forget that motorcycle engines can rev as high as 16,000 RPMs!  Frequent engine oil changes are the least expensive maintenance you can perform to keep your motor happy.

How do I break in a newly rebuilt motor?

Vary the engine RPMs for the first 500 miles. Return after 500 miles for an oil change and valve clearance inspection/adjustment.


162 Clara Street  I  San Francisco  I  415.777.3845